chines or round bilge most efficient ns14 - storerboatplans.com

Chines vs Round bilge – Is there evidence of superiority?

Traditionally we were all told that chines were draggy, induced vortices and were slow. But in restricted dinghy classes where different hull designs are allowed chines predominate. And now chines are appearing on yachts as well. Sailors seem to be voting with their feet. Is there evidence?
Affordable sails for Storer Boat Plans - Goat Island Skiff, OzRacer, PDRacer, Ocean Explorer

Affordably Priced Sails for Storer Boats

ReallySimpleSails.com saves $300 or more on your Goat Island Skiff, OzRacer or Ocean Explorer. These are full quality sails that we all have worked hard to keep the price down on.
Tornado - composite NS14 by Malcolm Eggins - composite hull, inlaid plywood deck

Thankyou Malcolm Eggins, designer and builder of sophisticated racing dinghies

Malcolm Eggins, boat builder and designer has passed away. A small tribute to one of the many people that has influenced me and many other sailors and designers. He was a part of the development of Moths, NS14s, VJs, VeeEsses and many other Australian racing dingies as a builder and designer along with his son Darryl. He won several State Championships.
Beth sailing canoe heading downwind with little fuss in British Columbia - article on fleet racing BETH.

How does the BETH sailing canoe go in mixed fleets and handicap racing?

BETH sailing canoe – The designer has lots of fine things to say about the sailing performance of BETH – but Andrew Barclay has been racing his against mixed fleets in British Columbia where she sails equal with Laser Radials in light wind and gradually outclasses them in stronger. I provide some tips about getting a bit more from the boat.

“Planing” is Bunkum – Myths about Planing, Displacement and semi Planing

It always bugged me about how people said that some powerboats and fast sailing dinghies would “plane” to reach high speed. But multihulls reach higher speed, but they “don’t plane”. It’s illogical to have two different explanations. Also how a classical “displacement hull” go much faster on an ocean wave. Theory says it has a speed limit no matter the power you throw in. I worked out a reasonable explanation for all this but it shows “planing” does not exist.

Book – “A lighter ton” – New Zealand racing yacht design in the 1970s

In the late 70s as a sailing teenager I drew boats on every available paper surface. A new book “a lighter ton” describes the exciting development of racing yachts to create newer, lighter, faster and cheaper and FUNNER boats. Many of the developments were from New Zealand designers such as Bruce Farr, Paul Whiting and Laurie Davidson. A new book by Richard Blakey covers this exciting experimental period in yacht design

Boat designs influenced by rules? History shows us canting keel maxis are stupid

This is an article about how bias in thinking produces weird results in terms of boat designs. I compare a silly boat design trend of 100 years ago with modern canting keel maxi yachts. Personally I don’t think they should be allowed to use engines to run the keels and the various systems – if they do then they should be disqualified from the event results. The conventional human powered boats should be listed as the winners of events.
Goat Island Skiff going fast downwind with heavy load - Texas 200

Strong wind downwind in unstayed Cat Ketches and Cat Yawls – more safety and efficiency

John Goodman and I sailed the immaculate Goat Island Skiff he built from my plan in the Texas 200. The boat showed itself to be one of the faster in the fleet despite loading up such a short boat with food, water and camping gear for six days with little outside support. We played with sailing the boat by the lee – a method used by racing boats to gain both speed and control. I document the method here including a video showing how the angle of heel can be controlled using the mainsheet.

Goat Island Skiff in Victoria – Dete Hasse and his boys (and the value of reefing

Dete Hasse and his family built a Goat Island Skiff in Geelong, Victoria a while ago. He has just written to me about his experiences trying to sail on Port Phillip Bay and more happily on the recently refilled (the drought is over!) Lake Eppalock. Also he makes some good comments about reefing and how it changes an overpowered boat into a much more rriendly beast in stronger winds.