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Reefing a balance lug sail

How to reef a Balance Lugsail. A neat trick of using shock cord (bungee) for the intermediate ties makes it much faster to tie in a reef as well as remove the reef after. it also minimises the risk of damaging the sail if something major breaks elsewhere.
reallysimplesails.com - Cheap sails for Goat Island Skiff, OzRacer, OzGoose, PDRacer, PDgoose

First sailing photos of low cost sails for Storerboats

After a week or so of bad sailing weather, Daniel in Uruguay got out on the water in Piriapolis harbour to try out his new sail from ReallySimpleSails.com in the Philippines. The idea is to halve the price of sails for my plans so that it is even more economical to build a storerboat. This can save $300 plus
Affordable sails for Storer Boat Plans - Goat Island Skiff, OzRacer, PDRacer, Ocean Explorer

Affordably Priced Sails for Storer Boats

ReallySimpleSails.com saves $300 or more on your Goat Island Skiff, OzRacer or Ocean Explorer. These are full quality sails that we all have worked hard to keep the price down on.
goat island skiff sneaky shark at English RAID

Club Racing the Goat Island Skiff – yardstick handicap racing

A quick jump to the end for those wanting to know the outcome.  George’s club yardstick is 1117.  That’s the same as an Enterprise or slightly slower than an OK.  George is an experienced larger yacht racer and you can see his learning curve in this article.  I’m sure there is more to come from […]
Beth sailing canoe heading downwind with little fuss in British Columbia - article on fleet racing BETH.

How does the BETH sailing canoe go in mixed fleets and handicap racing?

BETH sailing canoe – The designer has lots of fine things to say about the sailing performance of BETH – but Andrew Barclay has been racing his against mixed fleets in British Columbia where she sails equal with Laser Radials in light wind and gradually outclasses them in stronger. I provide some tips about getting a bit more from the boat.

Mark Milam’s gorgeous wooden Duck – an OzRacer RV sailboat

The OzRacer RV sailboat is meant to be a very simple boat that can be homebuilt. Most build it to get on the water quickly, but Mark Milam has done an amazing job of overseeing a project combining his work with that of a boatbuilder friend. Wonderful woods, some great detail design and the very best fitting of a windsurfer rig to a dinghy that I have ever seen.
Goat Island Skiff going fast downwind with heavy load - Texas 200

Strong wind downwind in unstayed Cat Ketches and Cat Yawls – more safety and efficiency

John Goodman and I sailed the immaculate Goat Island Skiff he built from my plan in the Texas 200. The boat showed itself to be one of the faster in the fleet despite loading up such a short boat with food, water and camping gear for six days with little outside support. We played with sailing the boat by the lee – a method used by racing boats to gain both speed and control. I document the method here including a video showing how the angle of heel can be controlled using the mainsheet.

Goat Island Skiff in Victoria – Dete Hasse and his boys (and the value of reefing

Dete Hasse and his family built a Goat Island Skiff in Geelong, Victoria a while ago. He has just written to me about his experiences trying to sail on Port Phillip Bay and more happily on the recently refilled (the drought is over!) Lake Eppalock. Also he makes some good comments about reefing and how it changes an overpowered boat into a much more rriendly beast in stronger winds.

The Canon – Tools for thinking about sailing and boat design – Books and Articles

One of the most important things as a designer or sailor is to keep an open mind, but also to be able to analyze things in light of real experience and prior knowledge. This article, after a bit of a spiel, goes on to give some great resources that “opened my eyes” at different times in my life. They focus on areas of structural design, sailing, sail aerodynamics and touch on a bit more.

Rules of thumb for boat and yacht design – are they legitimate?

There are lots of tips for building and designing boats on the net. “Rules of thumb” are often quoted to help with the calculation of how much sail or how much keel or centreboard area or how big a mast is allowed to be and many other areas. Can a boat be stretched or shrunk or lengthened? But how correct are they? Are they the best guide?