Q&A – Keep epoxy warm for good handling – Lightbox

There are huge advantages in keeping the epoxy at a slightly raised temperature.
* It flows out better onto the work
* It mixes easier
* The curing kicks off faster in cold weather (and the box can easily only be turned on when needed.

There are huge advantages in keeping the epoxy at a slightly raised temperature.

  • It flows out better onto the work
  • It mixes easier
  • The curing kicks off faster in cold weather (and the box can easily only be turned on when needed.

Right – light box.

Just a simple wooden box with a lightbulb inside and a switch on the outside. The swing down lid has slots so the tops of the epoxy pumps are outside the box or a hinged lid you just flip up when you need to pump.

Most of them have a angled lid on top.

Think about the orientation of the bottles vs the nozzles of the pump so you can get containers under the Knozzles when you open the hatch.

Keep the bottles around 150mm away from the globe which is mounted to the side of the whole shebang closest to the resin bottle – but about an inch (25mm) away from the bottle at least. Switch is on outside of same side.

Globe is 40 or 60 watts – probably 25 watts would be fine too.  Clever people and commercial setups sometimes fit a thermostat and/or timer.

Don’t get too carried away with nice finish – the interior is going to have an appearance of semi congealed epoxy after the first six months. And the outside will have a little of the same appearance.

In an emergency a cardboard box and a car workshop lightbulb on a cord will work fine.

And stick with the premium “high solids” epoxy systems – if you go for one of the solvent thinned (ie flammable) el cheapo resins you will burn your house down. Unless it is rented.

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On the "round Australia trip" I found myself employed by a tiny business in Adelaide - Duck Flat Wooden Boats in Adelaide.It was an eye opener - It became clear that one could build a boat for a fraction of the cost of current racing boats.My ideas hinged around high performance, easy building, fun to sail and reasonably cheapToday Storer Boats are built in all countries and we have active groups on Facebook for the following groupsGoat Island Skiff Open Goose Storer Boat plans Really Simple Sails